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Showing posts from January, 2009

Immigration and Adoption- Part I

Many couples choose to adopt from outside of the United States because of the excessive time and expense involved with domestic adoptions. Other factors such as the availability of infants and the health and/ or functionality of domestic birth mothers also play a significant role. Here are the answers to the most common questions asked by those about to embark on an international adoption.Do I have a better chance of adopting a young baby if I adopt internationally?Yes. It is easier to find an infant to adopt. Unless you are lucky enough to be picked by a birth mother in the United States, infants are more readily available in other countries. In a number of countries, it is possible to be matched with or locate an infant shortly after birth and to bring that child home to the United States before he or she reaches one year old. This of course reduces the risk of Reactive Attachment Disorder and intellectual delays caused by malnutrition in infancy. Older children are also more readil…

What to Expect at an Embassy Visa Interview

Visa applicants are advised to arrive at the embassy no more than 15 minutes before the scheduled interview; however the queue will start to form outside the embassy gates about an hour before hand. Most embassies have a kiosk at the embassy gates where you will be asked your name and appointment time. The guards have a list of those attending their interviews that day. You are not permitted to bring cell phones or bags into the embassy building and will be asked to leave these in the kiosk while you go into the actual embassy. Once inside, you will be directed to take a seat or a number. Embassy appointment offices look similar to (run-down) banks with (unhappy) bank-tellers. There will be a number of officers working at different windows. When your number or name is called you will speak to an officer, hand in your documents and make any necessary payments. The officer will check to make sure that you have the right kind of passport photos, a copy of your approval notice, completed…

Let Us Be the Voice for Family Unification for Immigration

The reunification of families is the foundation of our immigration system, and more importantly, the foundation of our society. Virtually every immigration law in place today is either designed to encourage families to reunite in the United States or to stay together as they immigrate. There are laws to reunite refugee families, keep the families of employment-based immigrants together, and, of course, enable a variety of close family members to immigrate to the United States if their relatives are U.S. citizens (USCs) or lawful permanent residents (LPRs). Congress has clearly and consistently emphasized the importance of families as the foundation of our overall immigration strategy. Or, at least it says it has. Current System Not Family-FriendlyUnfortunately, the reality of this nation’s family-based immigration system is that it is woefully inadequate in reuniting families in any reasonable timeframe. Congress’s failure to include family members in the legalization programs of the …